Recreational Parks

Bonnechere Provincial Park

Through what is now a 162-ha, Recreation Class park, the meandering Bonnechere River once carried furs and pine logs. Now canoes move along its leisurely, ever-changing path to Round Lake where there is a sandy beach and marked swimming area. The park includes a winding segment of the river and features naturally formed oxbow loops - U-shaped remnants of the river channel - and a sandy river delta that extends into Round Lake. The park is mostly forested, consisting of White Pine, White Spruce, Large-Toothed Aspen, and other species typical of the Great lakes-St. Lawrence forest. Trails pass an old beaver pond and marshes. A
historic depot depicts the life of early forest rangers.
Map/Trail
Impressions
MNR Report

Driftwood Provincial Park

The building of the Des Joachims hydroelectric dam in 1950 created a sheltered bay on the Ottawa River. In this 422-ha, Recreation Class park you can camp and swim along the sandy shore, and hike to lookouts for panoramic views of the river. Fishing and canoeing can take you deep into the countryside on both shores.
Map/Trail
Impressions
MNR Report

Carson Lake Provincial Park

The 12-ha Carson Lake Provincial Park is forested by stands of poplar, white pine and red pine. The park is situated within the Ontario segment of the Grenville structural provinces. The rocks here are of Middle Precambrian age. This area contains lake(s) designated for lake trout management. The park is a small holding located in an extensive area of strongly broken deep to shallow sandy till uplands with numerous bedrock exposures. [Noble 1984] Because of its small size and the fact that it is completely covered by development this holding has little representational value. [Noble 1984]
Map/Trail
Impressions
MNR Report
Comments